These Things that Have Taken Place

Now on that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened. While they were talking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him. And he said to them, “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?” They stood still, looking sad.

Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered him, “Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who does not know the things that have taken place there in these days?” 

He asked them, “What things?” – Luke 24:13-19a (NRSV)

A prayer for the journey…

God of the unknown, we are confused about the things that have taken place in these last days. We discuss them with one another, we read stories on the internet, we have Zoom meetings to try and make sense of what is happening. But we have no answers — and we wonder if answers even exist. And if they do, when will they be made known to us?

God of the journey, we wish to talk to you about the things that have taken place in these last days. We have celebrated the Good News of Easter Sunday and proclaimed the resurrection. Yet it still feels like Saturday. We can now grasp how the disciples did not understand the empty grave. How they didn’t seem to remember your promise to rise again. How they remained locked away in their homes.

God of creation, we see Spring emerging despite the things that have taken place in these days. We see the re-creation of what had seemed dead. But Spring was not dead, only dormant. It has been there despite Winter’s cold and darkness. Help us trust that re-creation will occur when stay at home orders and social distancing are over.

God to whom we belong in life and death, we are yours in the midst of the things that have taken place in these days. We are yours in the present unknown. We are yours in the future yet to come. Jesus, open our eyes so that we may recognize you among us, as you walk with us on this journey. Hold close this world you so love.

When you were with us on earth, you taught your disciples to pray a prayer of communal petition and blessing. From the many places we are — from the many places you are with us — we join our voices, saying: Our Father…

If you are interested in more prayers like this, consider checking out my book:

Prayers for the People: Scripturally Based Prayers for Worship Prayers for the People is a collection of prayers for worship. These prayers offer the worshipping community and individuals fresh perspectives for praying the words of Scripture, using current language and references. Cross-referenced to the Revised Common Lectionary, pastors seeking to lead their people in prayer have found a relevant and beautiful source for worship planning.

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